Designing a Cub Camp

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Designing a Cub Camp

Postby wagionvigil » Tue Aug 15, 2006 9:09 pm

I asked recenlty about designing the perfect high Adventure/Alternate Scout camp and everyone was very helpful. Now I am going one furthur.
What activities are required to have a great Cub Camp?
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Postby lifescoutforlife » Wed Aug 16, 2006 6:09 am

My youngest son (just finished Tigers) went to day camp and they had Archery & BB gun ranges ( only place you can earn these belt loops is camp with a person how is qualifed for the ranges) they also did fishing, crafts, swimming and some other sports that are easy to set up a place to play. They showed them some magic tricks that they all still talk about ( the camp was called "The magic of scouting") they all received t-shirts and a patch. My son really enjoyed himself and still talks about the archery range all the time even though all he talked about before he went was getting to shoot a BB gun.
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Postby wagionvigil » Wed Aug 16, 2006 7:31 am

May be I should clarify. "Long term Camp"
ALso while I am correcting this . Should we offer the same things at Day camps and parent Son Weekends that is offered at Long term Camp? ie; BB Guns, Archery etc or should those items we reserved or saved for the long term camps?
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Postby Mrw » Wed Aug 16, 2006 7:56 am

Although our cub day camp may have had archery, I know they did not have bb's.

My sons went to a couple different long term cub/webelos camps. Both programs were centered around activities in the books. For the cubs, it was more of the extra type things they could do to earn the arrow points rather than badge requirements.

For the Webelos, it was activity pin stuff and intro to boy scouts stuff. Activities were centered around the outdoor and adventure things, plus some crafts. I don't think they did any whole activity pin requirement sets, but the parts or options they might be less likely to do at home.
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Postby wagionvigil » Wed Aug 16, 2006 8:02 am

Several years ago we had a very strong Cub Camping program. Now it has really died and we are trying to rejuvenate it. I see the problem as too much duplication of adventurous activities. Plus parents taking the cheap way out. ie: day Camp and Parent Son of course these are the same parents that buy their kid a 150.00 pair of shoes :twisted:
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Postby Nuts4Scouts » Wed Aug 16, 2006 10:26 am

Plus parents taking the cheap way out. ie: day Camp and Parent Son of course these are the same parents that buy their kid a 150.00 pair of shoes.


Please, don't be a cost snob. I think that there are more families that do not buy their sons $150 shoes than do. I think that there are also a lot of families out there who have to scrimp and save to manage even the $40 for Day Camp.

If we target our camps at the families who can afford a BMW & $150 shoes, and look down our noses at the families who can only afford to "take the cheap way out", we are doing our boys a BIG disservice.

We need to offer a variety of camps, with a variety of cost options, that all offer fun, exciting, adventurous activities. Saving the "good stuff" for only the select few is very wrong.

Some great activities for Cub Camp would be:
Fishing
Map & Compass course
Rope bridges
Winter activities (snowshoeing, cross country skiing, sledding, etc)
Construction area w/tools
Catapults
Waterfront w/canoes, rafts, boats, etc
Bouldering
Wall climbing

Big stuff that they normally would not do except at camp.

My council is building a Cub World with different themed areas (knights, pirates, cowboys). Hopefully they will include some of the above facilities.
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Postby FrankJ » Wed Aug 16, 2006 12:53 pm

Things like archery & BB guns the kids will not get tired of. The requirements for qualified supervision are limiting enough I wouldn't limit it any further.

Activities should include anything fun that the camp has resources for. swimming, crafts, BB & archery, canoeing (especially since it has to be a council event per G2SS), sports, introductery climbing skills. I don't think any of this gets old if presented in the right way especially if they see the older boys getting greater challenges.

The biggest challenge would be getting councilors that interact well with the cubs.
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Postby Chief J » Wed Aug 16, 2006 1:00 pm

bb guns, and archery never get old. I know the Scouts who attend the cub camps in Greater Pittsburgh Council never get enough of this. Camp Independance even has an action archery course for 2nd Year Webelo's.

Intro to caving and climbing would be great. Swimming, and canoeing/rowing. etc.

I will echo those above me, a group of good motivated counselors will go along way with Cubs and give them a memorable experience.

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Postby gwd-scouter » Wed Aug 16, 2006 2:01 pm

If you are in the process of putting together a Cub Resident Camp, you will probably be required to go to National Camping School. Whether you will be Camp Director or Program Director, camping school is the best place to find out what you need to put together a successful program. Our Day Camp Directors are also required to go to Camping School.

Focusing many of your activities on the rank requirements of the Cubs is important, but make sure they are appropriate for their age and skill level. Provide the Webelos with something more challenging than what you plan for the Cubs. At our Resident Camp, all the scouts did BBs, archery, swimming, canoeing, nature hikes, and crafts. But the Webelos also went on an overnight campout where they hiked a little less than a mile to the campsite, pitched tents, cooked dinner and had a campfire program. Next morning, they packed up and hiked back. Our Resident Camp was also one day longer for Webelos than for Cubs.

You certainly will want to pick a theme for your camp and your activities will fall into that. For example: We did Cub Odyssey 2001 and made soda bottle rockets that the Scouts launched on closing day.
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Postby wagionvigil » Wed Aug 16, 2006 3:03 pm

OK I have been beat up a little. But the comment about the Camp being too expensive and the shoes I have seen and heard with my own two eyes. If I stepped on some toes I am truly sorry.
Now, Being a Climbing Instructor I would like to raise the age on climbing. But that is another story.*I would like to see a bouldering wall for the cubs nothing more. You still need something to look forward to. Caving is in the G2SS so there would be problems with Cubs caving. A manufactured Cave Would be great, but real NOPE!
Alot know that I work at a Cave. And the Insurer will not allow anyone under 12 in the undeveloped part of the cave. SO apparently they also see a problem.
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Postby cballman » Thu Aug 17, 2006 8:45 pm

also dont forget that when planning a cub experiance that it is not only just the cubs but also they have to have a adult partner or someone that takes care of them. so when planning an event make sure you include adult training. to keep the adults busy and away from the kids when they are having fun.
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Postby vpalango » Mon Aug 21, 2006 10:20 am

I'm not personally an authority on this, but our troop, last year, went for a week to the Gettysburg National Battlefield to earn the trail medal. We stayed during that week at Camp Tuckahoe, one of the York-Adams council camp.

At that camp they have a HUGE cubworld camping program, that goes on in parallel with the Boy Scout summer camp program. Basically they set asside a corner of the camp that's specifically set up for the cub program, and keeps them basically segregated from the Boy Scout program. I think (very unsure here), that they also incorporate some stuff where cubs can interact with the older group in a controlled manner as well.

I'd look into thier program, as it appeared to me to be very strong.

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Hmmm

Postby summertop » Mon Aug 21, 2006 11:39 am

Setting up a cub camp...don't forget leather work! My council has a GREAT cub camp program: Cub country and Webelos Woods.
Cubs have the basics (swimming, boating, bb's, archery, leather). But they also have compass games, map reading, obstacle course, nature hikes, science lab, etc. They are themed to provide more excitement and diversity: Spy Cubs, Indy's Egyption Treasure, Harry's Magical Fort, Pirate's Cove, Jedi Training, etc. There are also games the cubs learn for each themed camp. For example, at Harry's Magical fort, they played a version fo quidich. Each activity is run by a boy scout that works there all summer. The camp, itself, has full time adult staff to make sure everything runs smooth.

Every summer, the council changes the themes. That way it is always "new" and "exciting" for the cubs. Typically cubs/webelos will have the chance to go to camp for 3 summers.
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