Permission Slips/Medical Treatment

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Permission Slips/Medical Treatment

Postby fritz1255 » Mon Oct 17, 2005 7:29 am

We had a rather scary thing happen to us this past weekend. We were on a camping/biking trip with the Troop about 150 miles from home, and one of the Scouts starting feeling sick, with nausea and abdominal discomfort. My son just had his appendix out a year ago, and after talking to the boy about his symptoms, said that it sounded a lot like appendicitis. One of the parents was going home that afternoon (Saturday) anyways, so we sent the boy with him. Found out last night that my son's diagnosis was correct - the boy had his appendix out yesterday (Sunday).

In this case, it was caught early, but what would have happened if it was not, and one of us had to bring the boy to the local emergency room? We use a "generic" permission slip that says something to the effect that the boy has permission to be on the trip, but says nothing about authorization for medical treatment. Should we upgrade our permission slips, or is there some sort of "blanket" authorization for medical treatment included in the Boy Scout program?
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Postby Scouting179 » Mon Oct 17, 2005 7:49 am

Yes, I'd recommend that. We use such a form.
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Postby DadScout » Mon Oct 17, 2005 7:53 am

Hope the boy is doing well, sounds like it was caught in time.
Our troop uses a dual purpose form. The first part being a signature needed for permission to go on the trip. The second part being the signature needed for permission to treat. You also need to put down emergency contact information even though it's already on file with the troop. In addition to the copy kept with the scoutmaster at the event copies of this form is also given to any adult driver to/from an event. This way if anything happens in transit, that adult can get the needed treatment for the boy and has the contact information.

I would have thought this would be covered in G2SS but a quick glance and I didn't see it noted.
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Postby Chief J » Mon Oct 17, 2005 7:56 am

I would recomend that you upgrade your permission slips. If you look around the web, you will get many good examples. Our permission slips contain language similar to the BSA medical forms, and state that unit leaders may take a Scout to the hospital, and the hospital physicians may start treatment.

As SM, I carry a binder on all trips that has the Scouts permission slips, a copy of their most recent Class II physical, and the approved tour permit, as well as other paperwork.

Best Wishes,
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Postby evmori » Mon Oct 17, 2005 11:36 am

An upgrade is necessary for your protection.
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A stone unturned?

Postby riverwalk » Mon Oct 17, 2005 1:06 pm

It's a world of legal considerations. If you know what the likely receiving Hospital is (near your Activity)...clear your Form with them. Don't take the chance that they will accept whatever you think is okay.

Sounds like y'all made a good call. Society is often reactive. Scouters must "be proactive". It's another example of "BP", haha. :wink:
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Postby Rick Tyler » Mon Oct 17, 2005 2:48 pm

We use a permission slip that includes a "permission to treat clause." So far, it has been worthless. We have had to take a boy to the emergency room twice. Neither case was life-threatening, but both were serious (really bad leg break, and deep knife cut to the thumb). In both cases the ER refused to treat until they contacted the parents. If it had been life threatening, they would have treated without parental permission. They more-or-less didn't care that we had a signed permission slip.

I don't know what to make of this. We still require the permission slip, but I am pretty sure it is irrelevant. For what it's worth...
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Postby ASM-142 » Mon Oct 17, 2005 2:58 pm

Rick Tyler wrote:We use a permission slip that includes a "permission to treat clause." So far, it has been worthless. We have had to take a boy to the emergency room twice. Neither case was life-threatening, but both were serious (really bad leg break, and deep knife cut to the thumb). In both cases the ER refused to treat until they contacted the parents. If it had been life threatening, they would have treated without parental permission. They more-or-less didn't care that we had a signed permission slip.

I don't know what to make of this. We still require the permission slip, but I am pretty sure it is irrelevant. For what it's worth...


Could it be that the emergency room could not confirm that the signature was that of a parent? Do you think it would of been accepted if it was notarized?
If it is not written down then it is not an official rule
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Postby evmori » Mon Oct 17, 2005 3:02 pm

ASM-142 wrote:
Rick Tyler wrote:We use a permission slip that includes a "permission to treat clause." So far, it has been worthless. We have had to take a boy to the emergency room twice. Neither case was life-threatening, but both were serious (really bad leg break, and deep knife cut to the thumb). In both cases the ER refused to treat until they contacted the parents. If it had been life threatening, they would have treated without parental permission. They more-or-less didn't care that we had a signed permission slip.

I don't know what to make of this. We still require the permission slip, but I am pretty sure it is irrelevant. For what it's worth...


Could it be that the emergency room could not confirm that the signature was that of a parent? Do you think it would of been accepted if it was notarized?


If you have the Scout's medical form they could compare signatures thgat way.
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Postby aflmom » Mon Oct 17, 2005 3:45 pm

I use to work in an emergency room as a Registered Nurse.

Legally, we could not treat minors unless they were accompanied by a parent or legal guardian. Whether or not they had a permission slip was immaterial and thus the reason I have a hard time signing one for our son. :roll:

Even though a fracture or some other injury may be serious, it's not life-threatening and typically waiting to get permission isn't a problem--unless circulation is compromised.

As Rick stated, if an injury is life-threatening, they *have* to treat.
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Postby ASM-142 » Mon Oct 17, 2005 4:49 pm

evmori wrote:
ASM-142 wrote:
Rick Tyler wrote:We use a permission slip that includes a "permission to treat clause." So far, it has been worthless. We have had to take a boy to the emergency room twice. Neither case was life-threatening, but both were serious (really bad leg break, and deep knife cut to the thumb). In both cases the ER refused to treat until they contacted the parents. If it had been life threatening, they would have treated without parental permission. They more-or-less didn't care that we had a signed permission slip.

I don't know what to make of this. We still require the permission slip, but I am pretty sure it is irrelevant. For what it's worth...


Could it be that the emergency room could not confirm that the signature was that of a parent? Do you think it would of been accepted if it was notarized?


If you have the Scout's medical form they could compare signatures thgat way.


You then would be comparing the permission slip to another unknown signature (medical form)
If it is not written down then it is not an official rule
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Notary

Postby riverwalk » Mon Oct 17, 2005 11:27 pm

Yeah, we used to teach (in our Scouter SWAT sessions) that forms should be Notarized. 8)
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Postby fritz1255 » Tue Oct 18, 2005 7:51 am

Sounds like the "permission to treat" on the permission slip won't do the job. Need to ensure that all parents put emergency phone numbers on the slips. I HOPE that nobody is seriously suggesting that we get the permission slips notarized...........
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Postby wagionvigil » Tue Oct 18, 2005 8:22 am

Suggestion is check with your local High Band. If they travel they have a very detailed permission slip. Those around here actually require Notarization.
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Postby JazerNorth » Tue Oct 18, 2005 8:38 am

Just an FYI on Notarization:

Notaries are free if you know where to look. Almost every large business has a notary, and they notarize for free for all employees. Every bank has a notary, and if you are a customer, they do it for free as well. Some banks even notarize for free even if you are not a customer. Many law firms have notaries, but they usually charge. Land surveyors always have notaries as they must use them to change property lines, and if they are a local mom & pop place, they usually do it for free.

Now I am not saying we should notarize the permission slips, but to remove any misconceptions on notarizations, I thought I would put in those two cents worth.

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Postby scoutchallenge » Tue Oct 18, 2005 2:49 pm

My thought:

If it is a true emergency the hospital or doctor will take care to the emergency!!!!!!!!!!!

If it's not an emergency you have time to wait for a parent and I would do no more then call.

Let the professionals do their job
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Postby t305spl » Tue Oct 18, 2005 5:58 pm

Guys you really dont need a notary. To reiderate what scoutchallenge said:

1) If it is an emergency implied consent comes in to play and the hospital and First Responders have to treat.

2) If it is not an emergency then I would hope you would call the parents to ask for permission. Thats never a bad thing to do.

Dont worry just have a standard permission slip and you will be fine.
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Postby evmori » Tue Oct 18, 2005 9:00 pm

And you would need to have a notary present to notarize every permission slip for every trip. Not practical.
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Postby gatroop17 » Mon Oct 30, 2006 7:37 am

Hello all...First time poster here.

After reading through this thread, I pulled up the BSA Medical Class I/II and took a look at the signature block on it. It has the verbage on it for authorization for treatment so I would think keeping the medical form and permission slip together and carrying both to hospital would be best. In addition to the permission slip and authorization for treatment, you'd have all of the medical/insurance information also.

One other note, in big bold letters at bottom of the signature block it states some hospitals may require the form to be notarized and to check with your local BSA council.
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Postby Lynda J » Mon Oct 30, 2006 11:23 am

Check within your Troop or District for a Notary. I have been a Notary for nearly 30 years. Had never thought about doing a permission forms to treat. But think that will be happening next trip. One thing though. The permission to treat can not be a generic one, covering several outings. You should put one person's name on it that has the authority to give treatment permission. It should have the date the trip starts and the date it will be over and the location you are going. It should also list the parents name, address, and at least two phone numbers. Also remember is some states if the parents are divorced the siginature of both parents is required.
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